Eugene Marathon and Half-Marathon, May 2, 2010

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Tinman
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Re: Eugene Marathon and Half-Marathon, May 2, 2010

Post by Tinman » Thu Sep 23, 2010 8:50 pm

Marathon pace, especially for people who run around 2:00-3:30, is ideal for stimulating development of mitochondria (aerobic processing organelles in muscle fibers) of slow twitch fibers to the maximum concentration per fiber. Shorter and faster tempo at 2-2:30 pace or longer and slower tempos at 3-3.5 hours pace work great.

Note that pushing long, continuous tempos on tired legs may be a strategic mistake because chronic leg soreness results. Thereafter, for several days, running relaxed at the usual paces is very hard to do. Much like sprint training, long continuous tempo should be done on fresh legs. (This is my personal belief based on observing results of runners I've coached over the years.)

Regards,

Tinman
Last edited by Tinman on Thu Sep 23, 2010 8:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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ap4305
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Re: Eugene Marathon and Half-Marathon, May 2, 2010

Post by ap4305 » Thu Sep 23, 2010 9:15 pm

[quote="Tinman"]
Note that pushing long, continuous tempos on tired legs may be a strategic mistake because chronic leg soreness results. Thereafter, for several days, running relaxed at the usual paces is very hard to do. Much like sprint training, long continuous tempo should be done on fresh legs. (This is my personal belief based on observing results of runners I've coached over the years.)

[/quote]

To follow up on Tinman's point, we shouldn't underestimate the value of the 3-5 mile tempos around marathon pace.  Many of us had been conditioned to think that short tempos MUST be fast (10k-half marathon pace) and that a short tempo at marathon pace "isn't much of a workout."  However, if we take the continuum approach to training (meaning paces all interrelate along the pacing continuum, rather than looking at training paces in discrete zones), we realize the folly of leaving such a critical gap in the pacing scheme by neglecting this marathon pace range. 

Further, we pay a lot of attention to the big exciting 10+ mile marathon pace runs, but those runs are all made possible by some shorter tempo runs many months before the goal race often run slower than what our eventual race pace will be.  Wise sages like Tinman and malmo have been telling runners to ease back on the difficulty of tempo runs for decades....fortunately more runners are starting to approach tempo runs in with this concept. 
Allan Phillips
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Tinman athlete since 2003
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dwang_71

Re: Eugene Marathon and Half-Marathon, May 2, 2010

Post by dwang_71 » Thu Sep 23, 2010 10:53 pm

I am a new member to this forum and the Tinman training philosophy and I have had fantastic results so far. I have been following his program for two months and doing the TT Tempos at marathon pace and progressed my mileage up around ~80 miles a week for the last few weeks with the ability of hitting the key interval workouts and Big Workouts each week. I try to run one traditional 10k tempo run once ever two weeks to test my fitness and have found that I have improved my 10k time trial on my own route I run at home by about 1 min 24s(38:08 to 36:45) since following his training philosophy and this is during an untapered time trial. Thanks for this great thread. It has helped me gain more insight and provided me more motivation to stay through this program and follow AP's taper model. I am excited for my marathon in December and hope for a big PR! Keep up the great posts!

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